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Minimizing Conflict During Tenant Move-Out

Handling the tenant move-out process is usually a challenging task in property management, and mostly the conflict will be about the security deposit refund. In order to avoid this issue and other conflicts, it is important for the property management to make the tenant feel that the whole process is straightforward transaction. The steps involved in the move-out process should be made known to the tenants when they move in and sign the tenancy agreement or lease. It is also very important to keep proper documentation and open communications.

Giving Notice

Property management should mention in the contract or lease from the very start the procedure expected from tenants when they intend to vacate. The tenant has to give a written notice at least a month before the move-out date. It should be clearly stated that such notice should be in writing only, and no verbal notice would be considered. The notice should clearly mention the intention of moving out, the date of move-out, the address of the apartment or the property, and the signature of the tenant. Only when such notice is served to the property management, the move-out process would have initiated.

Property Inspection Prior to Move-Out

Conflicts usually arise when there is inspection before move-out and when there are going to be possible deductions from the security deposit amount. The best way to tackle this situation is to have a clear-cut policy about the whole thing. The tenant should be made aware that property management has a right to inspect the property during the last couple of weeks of the tenancy. Apart from that, the property manager should serve a two-day notice to the tenant before the inspection date.

The purpose of this inspection should also be made clear to the tenant, which is evaluating the property’s condition and tenant’s responsibilities before moving out. Scheduling such an inspection works out to the advantage of both the parties. Tenants will have a clear idea about what is expected of them if they want a full refund of their security deposit amount, and property management has set up a clear-cut process that provides required guidelines to the tenants, eliminating any ambiguity or confusion.

Statement Based on Property Inspection

Observations made by property management during the inspection should be itemized and documented, and the statement should be given to the tenant. Such a statement should clearly state the various things that have to be repaired or cleaned by the tenant for avoiding security deposit deductions. This itemized report has to be complete, accurate, and should confirm to the terms and conditions mentioned in the initial tenancy agreement or lease document.

Property Inspection after Move-Out

After the tenant has relinquished rights to the property and moved out, property management has to conduct another inspection to review the state of the property. The property manager will have to check whether the items mentioned in the inspection report has been taken care of by the tenant or not. It is a fantastic practice to take photos of the vacated property, which clearly shows the things left out by the tenant. This can prevent disputes and conflicts, when the deducted security deposit amount is refunded to the tenant.

How to Retain Dependable and Noteworthy Tenants

How to Retain Dependable and Noteworthy Tenants

One of the most important tasks in property management is retaining outstanding and impressive tenants. Retaining personable and friendly tenants over the long term will not only improve profits but there are much less hassles in managing the property. The longer tenants stay; there will be lesser turnover of units. Unit turnovers are expensive, which drains the profits.

An Understanding

Even if a new tenant occupies the unit the next day after the old tenant has gone, there are still many costs involved. To attain the new tenant, the property manager will have to spend on advertisements, the office staff will have to answer calls, the unit will have to be shown to prospective tenants, and a new lease will have to be made. The property manager will also have to return the security deposit to the old tenant, the unit will have to inspected, and the place will usually need a paint job and repairs to make it proper for the new tenant. All this takes a lot of time, effort, and money, whereas retaining tremendous and loyal tenants does not involve any costs.  

Pitiful & Uncaring Management

According to various surveys, one of the main reasons for tenants to seek new rentals is poor property management. Many tenants become frustrated with the poor state of the property and the nonresponsive attitude of property managers to get things repaired. If these two issues are handled professionally, there will be a drastic cut in the vacancy rate of any property.

Steady Communication

Being responsive is extremely important for a property manager while dealing with tenants. The property manager should not ignore calls, and talk to the tenants frankly about when the issues are going to become fixed. Tenants are more likely to get frustrated when they do not receive a response, whereas they will be more understanding when the property manager is responsive, even if the repairs are delayed.

Holding Up Your End of the Bargain

Addressing minor issues quickly is another way of keeping most tenants happy. In fact, it is better to have a system for preventive maintenance, where problems become fixed even before tenants have a chance to make a complaint. Preventive maintenance is an important part of professional property management and it should not be ignored. Such maintenance might require a little more investment but it works out much cheaper in the end in many ways.

Basic Rights

The property manager should also have respect for tenant’s privacy and not simply enter individual units anytime, without proper intimation. Everybody likes their privacy and nobody appreciates a person barging into their living space. Individual units have to be checked on a regular basis for preventive maintenance, but this can be done by scheduling visits or making appointments. Only when there is an emergency the property manager can enter the unit without prior notice.   

Simple Gestures & Actions

Finally, all tenants appreciate a property manager who keeps in touch and maintains a cordial relationship with everybody. It may not be possible to maintain face-to-face contact with all the tenants on a regular basis, but the manager can always send emails to say hi or wish tenants are doing well on special occasions and so on.

When is a property management company needed?

Hiring a property management company is a big decision for a property owner, and various aspects have to be evaluated before reaching a decision. Some property owners prefer to keep a resident manager, while some take the bold step of managing the whole property on their own. Here are certain important factors that should be reviewed to see if hiring a property management company would be anoutstanding and poignant decision.

Huge Property or Many Rental Units

When the property is huge or there are many rental units, it is wise to manage the show professionally by hiring a property management company. The sheer size of operations is too much for a single individual to handle.

Location of Rental Property

If the property owner is staying far from the property then it is advisable to hire a property management company, even if the area of property is small or there are few rental units. Many issues can crop up that cannot be handled from afar, unless there is a resident manager on the premises.

Interest and Time

Many property owners view their properties only as a lucrative investment and have no interest in managing the day-to-day requirements of running the show. Some property owners might be interested to have a hands-on approach but may not have the time, since they might be involved in improving their business, finding new properties, arranging renovations, and so on. Hence, if interest or time is lacking, it is best to hire a property management company.

Cost and ROI

Property management companies charge fees for their services and it is usually a percentage of the collected rent revenue. These fees can cut into the profit or ROI, and the property owner has to evaluate the returns carefully and compare it with the importance of the services offered. Secondly, the overall market situation and economy has to be considered. If the market is up and there are fantastic chances of lesser vacancies, then the property owner can seriously consider hiring a property management company. Even when markets are down, a shrewdand/or solid property management company might be able to improve the situation and still appeal to more tenants.

Expertise and Experience

Property management companies have much better expertise and experience in handling the various issues and legalities of managing rental properties. A small legal mistake can prove quite costly in the end and might open up the risk of costly lawsuits and huge settlements. Property owners have to comply with many complicated rules, and it is important to know various legal requirements. If the owner is not sure about these rules and regulations, it is best to hire a professional company that has marvelous knowledge in this area.

Not Wanting to be an Employer

Even if the property owner has hired a resident manager, the owner is still an employer and will have different responsibilities such as payroll and managing various legal requirements. Whereas a property management company is an independent contractor, where the property owner has minimum responsibilities.

Types of Tenancy Agreements in Property Management

The rental or lease agreement establishes the terms that enable the tenant rightful use of the property. In property management, it is important to understand the different types of leases or tenancy agreements. There are mainly two types of tenancy agreements:

Lease with a Fixed Term

The lease with a fixed term is the most common tenancy agreement. Such a lease will state the duration the tenant is allowed to use the property, and the time when the lease expires. The tenant may continue to use the property on renewal of such a lease. Typically, fixed termed lease is for a year or two years duration, but longer durations are also possible. Sometimes the fixed term lease can be for certain number of months to suit the needs of property management.

For instance, the lease might be for 14 months instead of the usual 12, so that the termination date coincides with termination date of other tenants. This is quite useful in property management, since all tenants will have a common termination date, on which the lease can be renewed or the tenant can vacate the property. Another consideration for property managers is to take advantage of the peak demand period for rentals. In such instances, the termination date of the lease will be during such a peak period, where it will be easy to obtain a new tenant.

Period-to-Period Lease

In this type of tenancy agreement, the lease initially is for a definite period, and is automatically renewed if it is not terminated by the tenant or the property owner. The duration can be for a period for a week, month, or year; however, such leases are usually for month-to-month. The automatic renewing can go on indefinitely, until the tenant or property owner formally terminates the lease.

Month-to-month rental agreements are usually favored by many tenants as it is quite flexible and they do not have to worry about breaking the lease before the termination date, as it can prove to be costly. However, this type of lease works in favor of property manager or property owner as well. If the tenant is causing problems, then a notice of nonrenewal can be served, which is much easier than giving reasons and terminating a lease in the middle.

Some other types of tenancy agreements are:

Tenancy at Will

In tenancy at will, the lease will be in force until the tenant or property owner terminates the agreement. The lease can be terminated whenever either party serves a notice. However, a reasonable period is usually mutually predetermined for serving such a notice. In tenancy at will, the notice can served at any time, whereas in period-to-period agreement there is a fixed duration for giving the notice.

Holdover Tenancy

This is not actually a type of lease agreement, but occurs due to circumstances. This happens when the tenant continues to live on the property after the lease agreement has expired, and has not renewed the lease. This type of tenancy is quite similar to trespassing, the only difference being the person had previously held the right to use the property.

How to Find the Right Tenants as a Property Manager

Renting to complete strangers is a very risky proposition; however, when you are having a huge property, you cannot limit your tenant prospects to known contacts, friends, and family. It is therefore very important in property management to know how to find the right tenants. Here are certain strategies to weed out the bad ones.

Background Checks

One of the most important duties of the property manager is to conduct a thorough background check on all prospective clients even when other information seems to be in order. According to a recent psychological study, it was found that most people lie about their background and try to hide things. Start with investigating criminal history of the prospective tenant.

Even though breaking the traffic rules is a crime, the property manager has to be concerned about serious crimes. These include drug dealing, robbery, and list of violent crimes. It is also very important to see if the name of the person is listed in the sexual predator or sexual offender lists. It is also possible to find out many things about people by checking their online presence on social networking sites.

Rental History

Checking rental history of the prospect from past property owners is important; however, this will not always be an accurate pointer. Some property owners or managers have been known to provide a false positive report, simply to get rid of a tenant who has been defaulting on rent payments. Secondly, first-time tenants like students or people from other cities will not have any rental history, and therefore it is best to check their financial background and creditworthiness.

Credit History and Financial Background

Even though it is not easy to maintain a perfect credit history in these hard economic times, property managers should set clear parameters for checking creditworthiness of a person. Ask for credit reports and credit scores, since these are fantastic indicators about the finances of a person. Finances can also be gauged by checking employment history and seeing whether the person holds a bank account. Checking with the individual’s current employer can reveal financial aspects about the person. Tax returns from previous years will also provide useful information about the financial background of the person.

Questionnaire

A cleverly designed questionnaire can reveal many interesting things about a person and it is possible to see if the person is lying. If the prospective tenant leaves certain questions unanswered, it should definitely sound the warning bell in those aspects. Here are some important questions that should be included in the questionnaire:

§    Do you have a good credit score?
§    Where are you employed?
§    Do you have a rental history?
§    Do you have pets?
§    Have you ever been arrested?
§    How many individuals are going to live on the property?
§    Are they family members?
§    Are you willing to sign a lease?
§    Do you have a bank account?
§    When are you planning to move in?
§    Do you have any disabilities?
§    Have you ever been evicted from a building?

If the prospective tenant does not know how to answer one or some of these questions or if you receive a form back that has one or many of these questions unanswered, that often is a warning sign. If they refuse to answer some of these questions, a red siren should be going off in your head. Silence does not personify honesty in this case.

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