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How to Handle Noisy Neighbor Complaint in Property Management


Property managers often receive complaints of noisy neighbors from many tenants. Dealing with such a complaint is usually quite tricky, since it can be difficult to monitor the decibel level, especially if the noise occurs at different times of the day or night. Tenants usually have issue with noise that is caused due to loud music or television, children crying or playing boisterously, parties, or gathering of friends. Here are some points to consider and tips to follow for resolving the problem of noisy neighbors.

Is the Complaint Valid?

First, determine if the complaint is valid, or the tenant is simply over sensitive to noise. Sometimes there might be some other issue between the neighbors, and even a little noise might be sparking anger in the tenant. For checking the merit of the complaint, the property manager might have to visit the units at various times, or ask the tenant to phone when the noise occurs. When the noise is occurring, ask the other tenants if they find the noise excessive or disturbing. After checking that the noise is indeed occurring, speak with the supposed culprit directly about the issue and find out what they are thinking.

They need to know they do not live in a house and that they need to keep the noise down and to change their habits.  

Determining the Severity of the Issue

The property manager needs to find out if the noise has occurred only once or it is an ongoing problem. Sometimes the tenant would have had a few guests over for the night that caused the noise, and this can be treated as a one-time offense. However, if the tenant is in the habit of playing loud music every day, then there is an issue but it can be dealt with.

Addressing Both Parties

If the complaint is valid, and it is an ongoing issue, the property manager should have a talk with the tenant causing the problem and let him know that noise complaint/s has been filed against him or her. If it is a first-time complaint, a warning will usually suffice. In addition, the property manager should speak with the tenant making the complaint and inform him or her that the issue has been addressed.

Repeated Complaints

If the offender tenant fails to heed the warning and continues with the noise, then the property manager will have to remind the tenant of the possible penalties according to the lease agreement. There should already be a clause in the tenancy agreement that deals with this issue. A copy of the signed agreement with the relevant parts underlined can be given to the tenant as a reminder. If the noise continues, then the tenant can be served with a formal notice. Such a notice will state that the tenant will have to immediately stop the noise or face eviction.

Eviction is the Final Resort

If the noise does not stop even after giving the notice, then the property manager will have to take steps to evict the tenant. However, this should be the last resort after giving fair amounts of warnings. The property manager should also gauge whether the noise is affecting quality of life of the other tenants and then take the necessary measures. Sometimes people are just rude and they have to learn the hard way.