Clutter is a challenging situation for property management, since the looks of the property play an important role in attracting new prospects. If applicants are confronted with units that are cluttered and messy, it leaves a poor impression. It is possible for the property manager to overlook the clutter that could be slowly accumulating on the balconies and patios of the units. It is therefore a prudent idea to take a round early in the morning, and view the property from the standpoint of a prospective tenant. A property manager is seldom lucky to see clean and neat balconies. Most often, balconies and patios are filled with old furniture and stacks of boxes in addition to the regular table and lawn chairs. This is a common problem for property management and here are a few tips to keep this in check. Be Clear from the Start Being clear from the start will save property manager many issues later. List the things that are specifically not permitted on patios and balconies, and this list could be included in the terms and conditions, or as a clause in the lease document. When tenants move in, they can be given a list of what items are acceptable. Include many things as possible, so that you do not appear very restrictive; however, make sure there are no items that would give the balcony a cluttered appearance. Enforce No Clutter Policy Unless you enforce the no clutter policy, tenants will not be inclined to follow it. There should be penalties or consequences if the anti-clutter rules are violated. Treat the violation as any infraction of the lease, and make the consequences more severe, if the tenant does not heed the warnings. Start the warnings with a notice of violation of the lease terms, and provide a period for the tenant to clear out the items, which are specifically not permitted. Fines and penalties can be levied if the tenant fails to take any action. Provide Incentives In the list of community activities and events, include a contest for the best patio or garden. You will find many tenants to be quite creative, and some might even manage to store things without the place appearing cluttered. You could allow such creativity, provided it does not include items that are specifically not permitted on patios and balconies. Offer Storage Solutions Many families have quite a bit of stuff, and they really might not have sufficient space, especially if the area of the unit is small. One option would be to provide smart storage solutions in the unit itself. If renovations are not possible, then property management can take a proactive stand and partner with some storage facilities in the area, which will help in providing tenants with a discounted rate. Rules against clutter can be quite difficult to enforce, and some tenants might not appreciate it. However, property management should make tenants understand the value of a good-looking property and that building such an image is beneficial for all.